YIWCL

Young Indigenous Women's Circle of Leadership (YIWCL)

APYWCLNow entering its 8th year the Young Indigenous Women's Circle of Leadership 2016 (YIWCL) will take place July 2016, at the Faculty of Education, University of Alberta. Young Indigenous Women's Circle of Leadership (YIWCL) program is for young aboriginal women aged 10-16. Each day, participants are immersed in Indigenous language and cultural activities, drama, dance, digital technologies, and leadership building.

Camp dates: Monday, July 4th - Wednesday, July, 13th.

Registration FormSpace in Young Indigenous Women's Circle of Leadership (YIWCL) is very limited.  To reserve a space for your daughter, niece, or grand daughter, please fill out and submit the following form:

 

If you have any questions or would like more information, please contact the YIWCL Director:

Rochelle Starr
Phone: 780-492-4188
E-mail: cilles@ualberta.ca

How to apply to the YIWCL?

YIWCL camp will run July 4-13, 2016 (9 a.m. - 4 p.m.) in Education South building, 10th Floor Lounge. Ready to apply for next year? Please register here. If you want to know more about the program or need any more information, please contact:

Rochelle Starr
YIWCL Director
Faculty of Education, University of Alberta
(P) 780.492.4188
cilles@ualberta.ca

YIWCL

Young Indigenous Women's Circle of Leadership (YIWCL) is a summer program hosted by the Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, for young aboriginal women aged 10-16. Each day, participants are immersed in indigenous language and cultural activities, drama, dance, digital technologies, and leadership building. It was a great success and we look forward to next year.

“A nation is not conquered until the hearts of its women are on the ground”
Cheyenne saying


Did you listen the Young Indigenous Women's Circle of Leadership (YIWCL) interview on CJSR?

YIWCL Activities

APYWCL Activities

   "This year I am not only going into grade eight, I am going with a new experience behind"

 

 

 

 

 

APYWCL Activities

   “I learned the importance of helping others. This has taught me that leadership affects the many aspects of my life as well as the lives of others. Responsibility and respect have been a huge part also, where it be respecting others or taking actions for your mistakes. For the great help I would like to say thank you to the leaders for giving us an opportunity to explore and share new knowledge.”

 

APYWCL Activities

 

“During YIWCL I learned the importance of belonging because everyone actually did make me feel at home. I made lots of friends, had lots of fun. It made me feel like I belong.”

 

 

 

 

Program Activities:

  • Cree Language Immersion
  • Cultural Crafts and Traditional Teachings: Beading, Smudging
  • Creative Drama and Storytelling
  • Digital Technology and Literacy
  • Carpentry
  • Rock Climbing
  • Swimming

Circles of Leadership

SAndra Lamouche BlogThis July I was honored to teach hoop dancing for the Aboriginal Girls Leadership Circle hosted by the University of Alberta. The summer camp was focused on Cree language and culture, all the instructors were Cree women who also served as role models and mentors.

Over the years I have been blessed to perform, teach, and/or present for many different audiences, from Toronto business men to homeless youth; police officers to prison inmates; from daycare centres to universities; from isolated First Nations communities to New York City. One thing I have realized from these different experiences is that I am assumed to be the role model, but from my perspective, it is often the other way around. Whatever walk of life, the people I meet inspire me. I am inspired to try harder, I am humbled, I develop compassion for others, and so much more.

The Aboriginal Girls Leadership Circle was no different. My week with them taught me a special lesson on the meaning of...

Indigenous fitness program teaches teens healthy living through nature

Indigenours fitness program teaches teens healthy living through natureThe Alliance Pipeline Young Women’s Circle of Leadership (APYWCL) has sought to provide resources to young Aboriginal women for the last seven years, and has this year introduced an Indigenous obstacle course and fitness program to address those physical challenges as well. 

“I connected the Four Directions teachings, which is Cree traditional knowledge — Indigenous knowledge — and connected that to fitness.” 

Misty Underwood, a graduate student from the University of Texas at Arlington, designer of the program and a descendant of the Muscogee Creek and Choctaw First Nations

While leading the group, Underwood instilled a sense of stewardship for nature in the girls, encouraging them to respect their environment and exist as codependents within their world.

You can read more here.

YIWCL on Illuminate - Faculty of Education Magazine

Illuminate News ArticleWhile Canadians grapple with how to handle the legacy of these schools, UAlberta’s Faculty of Education has spent the past seven years trying to heal some of those wounds. Founded by Elementary Education professor Heather Blair in 2008, the Alliance Pipeline Young Women's Circle of Leadership (APYWCL) strives to restore some sense of identity and belonging to young Aboriginal women while teaching them valuable skills based in traditional Aboriginal culture.

“Residential schools really put a huge barrier in the ability to pass on that knowledge from generation to generation,” explains Rochelle Starr, director of the APYWCL. “So right now, we’re just trying to provide access to that knowledge that they should know, and by no fault of their own, don’t know.”

“The traditional knowledge that they’re learning right now has been around for thousands of years, but it’s still just as valuable in our everyday lives as it was a hundred years ago,” says Rochelle Starr

Click or tap here to read on Illuminate - Faculty of Education Magazine 

Young Indigenous Women's Circle of Leadership

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